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Posted by on Jun 14, 2013 in Medical Journals |

Elevated tryptase levels selectively cluster in myeloid neoplasms: a novel diagnostic approach and screen marker in clinical haematology.

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Eur J Clin Invest. 2009 Oct;39(10):914-23. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2362.2009.02184.x. Epub 2009 Jun 12.

Elevated tryptase levels selectively cluster in myeloid neoplasms: a novel diagnostic approach and screen marker in clinical haematology.

Sperr WR, El-Samahi A, Kundi M, Girschikofsky M, Winkler S, Lutz D, Endler G, Rumpold H, Agis H, Sillaber C, Jäger U, Valent P.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent data suggest that tryptase, a mast cell enzyme, is expressed in neoplastic cells in myeloid leukaemias. In several of these patients, increased serum tryptase levels are detectable.

MATERIALS AND

METHODS:

We have determined serum tryptase levels in 914 patients with haematological malignancies, including myeloproliferative disorders (n = 156), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS, n = 241), acute myeloid leukaemia (AML, n = 317), systemic mastocytosis (SM, n = 81), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 59) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (n = 26). Moreover, tryptase was measured in 136 patients with non-neoplastic haematological disorders, 102 with non-haematological disorders and 164 healthy subjects.

RESULTS:

In healthy subjects, the median serum tryptase was 5.2 ng mL(-1). Elevated serum tryptase levels were found to cluster in myeloid neoplasm, whereas almost all patients with lymphoid neoplasms exhibited normal tryptase. Among myeloid neoplasms, elevated tryptase levels (> 15 ng mL(-1)) were recorded in > 90% of patients with SM, 38% with AML, 34% with CML and 25% with MDS. The highest tryptase levels, often > 1000 ng mL(-1), were found in advanced SM and core-binding-factor leukaemias. In most patients with non-neoplastic haematological disorders and non-haematological disorders analysed in our study, tryptase levels were normal, the exception being a few patients with end-stage kidney disease and helminth infections, in whom a slightly elevated tryptase was found.

CONCLUSIONS:

In summary, tryptase is a new diagnostic marker of myeloid neoplasms and a useful test in clinical haematology.

PMID: 19522836 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]